Madie drove 200 miles at a speed of 50 miles per hour. Which equation will help you find the number of hours she was driving? StartFraction

Question

Madie drove 200 miles at a speed of 50 miles per hour. Which equation will help you find the number of hours she was driving? StartFraction 50 miles Over 1 hour EndFraction = StartFraction 200 miles Over question mark hours EndFraction StartFraction 50 miles Over 1 hour EndFraction = StartFraction question mark hours Over 200 miles EndFraction StartFraction 200 miles Over 1 hour EndFraction = StartFraction 50 miles Over question mark hours EndFraction StartFraction 200 miles Over 1 hour EndFraction = StartFraction question mark hours Over 50 miles EndFraction

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Claire 4 weeks 2021-11-10T13:28:28+00:00 2 Answers 0 views 0

Answers ( )

    0
    2021-11-10T13:29:36+00:00

    A

    Step-by-step explanation:

    0
    2021-11-10T13:29:46+00:00

    Answer:

      StartFraction 50 miles Over 1 hour EndFraction = StartFraction 200 miles Over question mark hours EndFraction

    Step-by-step explanation:

    For constant speed, miles and hours are proportional. One possible equation is …

      \dfrac{50\,\text{miles}}{1\,\text{hour}}=\dfrac{200\,\text{miles}}{?\,\text{hours}}\qquad\text{matches the first choice}

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    Comment on the solution

    I personally like to put the unknown in the numerator, so the equation can be solved in one step. The equation above requires two steps: one to cross-multiply, and one to divide by 50.

    I might write the equation as …

      (? hours)/(200 mi) = (1 hour)/(50 mi) . . . . multiply by 200 mi to solve

    Another way to write the equation is matching the ratios of times to corresponding miles:

      (? hours)/(1 hour) = (200 mi)/(50 mi)

    This only requires simplification to solve it: ? = 4.

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45:7+7-4:2-5:5*4+35:2 =? ( )