What does the converse of the Pythagorean Theorem say about a triangle with sides of length a, b, and c, where c>a and c>b?

Question

What does the converse of the Pythagorean Theorem say about a triangle with sides of length a, b, and c, where c>a and c>b?

A. If it is a right triangle, then a2+b2=c2.

B. If a2+b2=c2, then it is a right triangle.

C. If it is not a right triangle, then a2+b2≠c2.

D. If a2+b2≠c2, then it is not a right triangle.

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Ivy 3 weeks 2021-09-27T13:25:28+00:00 2 Answers 0

Answers ( )

    0
    2021-09-27T13:26:44+00:00

    Answer:

    b

    Step-by-step explanation:

    0
    2021-09-27T13:27:06+00:00

    Answer:

    B. If a2+b2=c2, then it is a right triangle.

    Step-by-step explanation:

    The converse of the Pythagorean theorem says

    “if the sum of the squares of the two sides is equal to the square of its longest side, then the triangle is a right triangle.”

    Which means for a triangle with sides a, b, and c, where c> a & c>b, if

    a^2+b^2=c^2, then it is a right triangle.

    Therefore, choice B: If a2+b2=c2, then it is a right triangle., is correct

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